ST Elevation on an EKG

When you hear people discussing EKG’s/ECG’s you may hear them refer to something called ST Elevation. A normal EKG/ECG (produced by a healthy heart) is called Normal Sinus Rhythm and appears on an EKG as follows:

Example of what Normal Sinus Rhythm looks like on an EKG/ECG

Example of what Normal Sinus Rhythm looks like on an EKG/ECG

ST Elevation, by contrast, refers to an EGK where the ST segment of the PQRST complex is abnormally elevated above the isoelectric line (the baseline). By definition, an abnormally high ST segment elevation is at least 1mm (one small square) higher in any of the precordial leads or 2mm (two small squares) higher in any of the limb leads. In a normal EKG the ST segment is not elevated but when the heart is damaged or suffers from some kind of patho-physiological insult (such as inflammation / pericarditis) it’s electrical properties change which in turn represent graphically on the Electro-Cardio-Gram (ECG or EKG, which stands for the same thing). ST Elevation looks like this:

This is what ST Elevation looks like on an EKG / ECG

This is what ST Elevation looks like on an EKG / ECG

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